Join Us to Watch The Letter

Join Us to Watch The Letter

Join Us to Watch The Letter

On Thursday, April 27th at 7 pm, we’ll gather in the Parish Hall to watch The Letter. After, we’ll enjoy refreshments and talk it over.

What’s it about? It’s  a documentary – a reflection and story about frontline leaders traveling to Rome to talk with the Pope about his encyclical on the environment – and the environmental crisis we are in.  In May of 2015 – six years ago – Pope Francis issued his encyclical letter, Laudato Si’. He opens his letter about caring for our common home by citing St. Francis of Assisi, whose name he took when he became pope.

“I believe that Saint Francis is the example par excellence of care for the vulnerable and of an integral ecology lived out joyfully and authentically. He is the patron saint of all who study and work in the area of ecology, and he is also much loved by non-Christians. He was particularly concerned for God’s creation and for the poor and outcast. He loved, and was deeply loved for his joy, his generous self-giving, his openheartedness. He was a mystic and a pilgrim who lived in simplicity and in wonderful harmony with God, with others, with nature and with himself. He shows us just how inseparable the bond is between concern for nature, justice for the poor, commitment to society, and interior peace,” Pope Francis writes.

You can read Laudato Si’ through this link.

See you in April, we hope!

 

 

Leftovers! They’re delicious and good for the earth, too.

Leftovers! They’re delicious and good for the earth, too.

Leftovers! They’re delicious and good for the earth, too.

Leftovers deserve another look!! Using bits and pieces of ingredients in the pantry or refrigerator – often leftover from other dishes – makes delicious new dishes. These kinds of dishes are economical, too. What’s more, using up what’s available reduces waste — which is a concern we can all get behind. It’s even one of the options of the Go Green for Lent initiative this year: reducing food waste. So, ministry members from the Social Justice and Peace Commission are sharing some recipes that are their “go to” options throughout the year.  You’ll find two below!

Leftovers Frittata
6 large eggs
1/4 cup whole milk or cream
1/2 teaspoon salt & 1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 – 1/2 cup cheese
3 cup cooked meat &/or vegetables

Bake in well greased 10 inch pan, though well-seasoned cast iron is ideal at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes. Check 5 minutes early. Should be barely set and a bit trembling. Do not over bake!!
Serves 4-6
Good hot or room temperature.

Here’s how to do it: Sauté any uncooked items (veggies or meat) until a little brown for added flavor. Avoid too much moisture. Sprinkle cheese over, and pour mix of eggs and milk.

Ratio of ingredients important. There are endless options for combinations of flavors:
Yogurt or crème fraiche in place of milk (full fat important )
Cheeses- cheddar, Swiss, fontina, feta, Jack ( plus bit of Parmesan opt)
Meat, bacon, sausage, chicken, fish.
Onions, bell peppers, mushrooms, broccoli, beans, peas, potatoes, spinach, squash, corn, tomatoes, kale, sun-dried tomatoes.
Garlic, herbs, mixed seasonings.

Enjoy! B.D.
from SJ & P Commission

And, for DESSERT:

Noodle Pudding

4 cups cooked pasta or egg noodles
2 cups milk
½ cup sugar
2 tablespoons butter
1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 eggs beaten
½ cup of raisins or other dried fruit

Preparation:

  1. Warm the milk, butter, sugar, and cinnamon in a saucepan over low heat until the butter melts.  Take off heat to cool.
  2. Heat oven to 350.
  3. Butter a 4-6 cup casserole dish and fill with cooked noodles and dried fruit tossed to combine.
  4. Add eggs to the cooled milk mixture.  Whisk and pour over noodles.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes.
  6. Optional:  Sprinkle small amount of sugar and cinnamon on the top before baking.

    Enjoy!! Carole from SJ &P Commission

Go Green for Lent 2023

Go Green for Lent 2023

Go Green for Lent 2023

We’d love to have you join Our Lady of Hope’s Social Justice and Peace Commission, the Jesuit Community, and other parishioners in taking environmentally friendly actions as part of a Lenten practice this year. Consider choosing one of the actions listed on our poster as your Lenten practice this year. Choose one or more to embrace and put a green dot on the poster outside of Mass this weekend – and each weekend throughout Lent.  Below are the examples of some steps to choose from:

No TV (or streaming) one or more nights during Lent.
Give up one or more single use plastics – e.g. water bottle, straws, cutlery.
Walk, Bike, take Public Transportation, or Carpool to work one day each week.
Eat vegetarian for 2 nights each week.
Reduce Food Waste.  Some resources are here:
 https://ignatiansolidarity.net/blog/2020/02/24/lenten-food-waste-fast-week-1/
Buy only necessities! Buy produce at a winter farmers market. Participate in No Buy Lent.
Declutter one spot at home each day during Lent.
Turn phone off during evenings with family.
Pray: Do Earthbeat’s Lenten Daily Food Reflection
Almsgiving – Examples of charitable nonprofits whose missions serve people and the planet:

Increase Awareness of Injustice in Our Society. Selections of suggested reading:

You may find these documentary films to be of interest:
13th: traces the mass incarceration of black men back to the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1865 (streaming on NetFlix)
The Letter: tells the story of various frontline leaders’ journeys to Rome to discuss the encyclical Laudato Sí with Pope Francis (streaming on YouTube)

Have other suggestions?  Send them in and we’ll keep adding to the resource list!

May our Lenten journeys be fruitful – for us as individuals and for us as a parish community.

Charity and Justice During Lent 2023

Charity and Justice During Lent 2023

Charity and Justice During Lent 2023

“If you remove from your midst oppression, false accusation, and malicious speech; if you bestow your bread on the hungry and satisfy the afflicted; then light shall arise for you in the darkness and the gloom shall become for you like midday.” Is 58:10.

Removing oppression and sharing bread with the hungry continues to raise the themes of charity and justice introduced in last week’s readings that called us to hunger and thirst for righteousness. The notion of sharing bread with the hungry points to the function of charity. We witness those around us who do not have enough – food, clothing, or shelter. Those with the resources can choose to share from their surplus – by making a donation or sharing the resources needed (e.g. cans of soup or dry goods to the food pantry).

In just about three weeks, we begin the season of Lent. Almsgiving (charity) is one of the three pillars of lenten practice – with prayer and fasting being the other two. Clearing out one’s pantry and donating surplus food to the food pantry; or clearing out one’s closet and donating unused clothing to the St. Vincent de Paul Society are wonderful ways to observe Lent through almsgiving. Likewise, making a financial donation to a favorite charity is a great example of almsgiving during the Lenten season. The practice of charitable giving – “bestowing bread on the hungry” – is a source of light in the world as it provides an example of loving service and as a witness to the worth and dignity of all human beings. Likewise, those who volunteer their time or have taken a job administering these charities help to keep the light shining in a way that calls others to a loving response.

Charity does not address the theme of justice. “Justice is the moral virtue that consists in the constant and firm will to give their due to God and neighbor. Justice toward God is called the ‘virtue of religion.’ Justice toward men disposes one to respect the rights of each and to establish in human relationships the harmony that promotes equity with regard to persons and to the common good” (The Catechism of the Catholic Church #1807). The accompanying graphic on this page (from @restoringracialjustice) helps illustrate the differences between equality, equity, and justice.

A justice approach will begin to explore ways to distribute support so that all get what they need. It also begins to examine the underlying structures that block access to resources. For all of us at times, the questions and issues this orientation raises can feel overwhelming. They certainly feel beyond what one can do as part of a Lenten practice. While we might not be able to solve issues of inequality in our society as a part of our Lenten practice – we can begin to explore what our faith has to say about these inequalities and how Catholic Social teaching might allow us to do our part in beginning to address these issues.

With this goal in mind, we’ll be presenting a special game time on Saturday March 4 – 10 AM – Noon.
– During this time, we’ll have a brief introduction to Catholic Social Teaching.
– We’ll play a game called Inequality – opoly – a game that allows us to experience inequality through the taking on of an assumed identity that will determine the likelihood that you will participate in or avoid certain events in the game based on the role of the dice.
– We’ll conclude the morning by seeking to apply the social justice teaching to our experience of inequality.

If your lenten practices include things like learning more about the Catholic faith; responding more to those in need; or connecting with others – this morning may help to put these practices into action. RSVP to ourladyofhope@portlanddiocese.org

Fr. Brian Conley, SJ

Donation Drive for Hope House

Donation Drive for Hope House

Donation Drive for Hope House

Once again this year, we are having a donation drive for household items that will help to ease the way for asylum seekers served by Hope Acts here in Portland. If you’re able to help, simply bring an item or two with you to Mass the weekend of February 11 & 12. The items most needed include:

  • Gift Cards for Gas or Groceries
  • Paper Products
  • Cleansers and Detergents
  • Unscented Bar Soap
  • Sponges and Mops
  • Diapers

Thank you for living the Gospel message by helping our new neighbors.

Our Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness

Our Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness

Our Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness

“Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness for they will be satisfied.” Matthew 5:6.

What does it mean to hunger and thirst for righteousness? The hunger and thirst for righteousness suggests that we are aware that the world around us is not always fair, right or always just. When we are moved by our encounter with the unmet needs of others, we become aware of our hunger and thirst for righteousness. The ability to empathize with other human beings is a part of being human. Our Lady of Hope parishioners consistently demonstrate their empathy and compassion through:

• buying Christmas presents for those listed on our giving trees,
• donating food to the food pantry,
• donating clothes to the St. Vincent de Paul Society,
• buying toiletries for refugees who have arrived in Maine,
• giving money to Catholic relief efforts for areas devastated by hurricanes, and
• expressing solidarity with those experiencing war or violence

And, in many, many other ways.

Responding to Those in Need
Throughout its history, the Catholic Church has sought to respond to those in need. In his book, “Living Justice: Catholic Social Teaching in Action,” Fr. Tom Massaro SJ points to a new perspective. He writes, “The difference is that today, according to the newer model of church activity that emphasizes justice in addition to charity, more church efforts consist of indirect attempts to change social structures (including civil laws and government budget priorities) so that all people may have a better and fairer chance of living a good life.”

In our compassionate and empathic response to those in need around us, we can find common ground, even when otherwise divided by differences of ideology or philosophy. We can move beyond these disagreements to put a common love of neighbor into action. Catholic social teachings over the last century have invited us to look at both addressing the immediate needs we see before us and to begin to address the underlying structures that create and sustain the unfairness in our world, nation, and region.

An Invitation to Notice
Last week, I invited us to use the archeologist’s tools to begin to notice patterns in our lives and society. This week, I’m inviting us to notice specific patterns, the pattern of unfairness and injustice in our society, whether experienced by us personally or experienced by others. To notice our movement to empathy and compassion resulting in a move to action. Finally, beginning to notice whether we feel a call to respond to the immediate need (charity) or the underlying root causes (justice) of the unfairness or injustice.

Fr. Brian Conley, SJ

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